Lt. Gen. Harold G. Moore: Last Man Out

Lt. Gen. Harold G. Moore of Crested Butte told his men: ā€œIā€™m going to be the first man on the ground in any big battle we go into, and I am going to be the last one out.ā€

For three days in 1965, Lt. Col. Harold G. Moore fought and won the first great battle of the Vietnam War and changed the course of history. Outnumbered 10 to 1, the first battalion of the 7th Air Cavalry not only survived but managed to send the People’s Army of Vietnam (PAVN) into a temporary retreat.

But when a relief battalion arrived, the commander refused to leave. The officer he had put in charge of tracking the 79 dead and 121 wounded as they were being airlifted out had unsettling news. Somewhere out there, amid the knifelike elephant grass where more than 1,000 enemy dead had been left to rot in the 110-degree heat, was Thomas C. Pizzino of Hopedale, Ohio.

Moore would not leave him there. Three months earlier at Fort Benning, Ga., he had promised his men that none would be left behind on a jungle battlefield. Later, helicopters were so full of dead and wounded men that blood drained out of the cracks in the fuselages.

“I’ve always been a strong believer that you bring home your men. If they are dead, you go get them. You bring them back,” Moore said during an interview at his home in Crested Butte. “I had told my men that I’m going to be the first man on the ground in any big battle we go into, and I am going to be the last one out. I’m going to bring you all home, and if I go down, I hope you’ll bring me home.”

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